Conference: 2018 Conference Proceedings

Boston, MA

Proceedings

The SSC Roundtable session is an opportunity for those working in day school, synagogue, and JCC libraries to meet together and exchange ideas. We plan to change up the format this year and allow participants to rotate among different “round tables” to discuss specific issues and challenges and share success stories and tried and true strategies.

The committee will discuss favorite Jewish children’s books as seen from the award submissions and give a behind-the-scenes look at how the award winners are selected.

The 2018 award winning authors and illustrators will present their books. This award is given each year in three categories: Younger readers (grades PreK-3), Older readers (grades 4-8) and Teen readers (grades 9-12) for books that exemplify the highest literary standards while authentically portraying the Jewish experience. Winner, Honor, and Notable books are given in each category.

Hebrew illuminated books rich with color and intriguing imagery offer a means of conveying complex ideas of Jewish spirituality, history and thought to the reader through a joyful, yet intimate reading experience. In the four decades since the advent of a popular internet, as visual iconography has increasingly augmented the power of the written word, the power of Jewish iconography to convey Jewish values, thought and text becomes increasingly relevant in many aspects of Jewish life.

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The Judaica Collection of the Harvard Library has as its mission the documentation of the Jewish people throughout history in order to support teaching and research at Harvard and to serve as a resource for the global scholarly community. One of the key components in carrying out that mission is the documentation of Jewish life and culture in the State of Israel.

At the 2015 AJL conference in Washington, DC, there was a presentation about a fledgling project called Footprints, which had the ambitious goal of tracking the movement of all printed Jewish books from the hand-press era (through 1800). Since that time, Footprints has grown to world-renown, with partners across the United States, Europe and Asia. How did a small project between a librarian, two historians, and a Talmudist grow the way it did, with no paid staff or direct funding?

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Authors of both fiction and non-fiction books must do serious research before beginning to put words on paper. Facts must be checked. Characters – both real and imagined – must be fleshed out. Librarians are important partners in this process. This panel of authors and librarians will discuss how they work together to make books come alive.

Jewish children’s books have a history of reflecting Jewish values - social justice and activism, kindness and compassion, the value of education, etc. A panel of social justice educators will discuss sharing books with children and helping young people find their voices in whatever endeavors motivate them to help change the world for the better.

Jews have been part of the American fabric since 1654, yet you wouldn’t know that from the history courses Jewish kids take. Textbooks reveal little about the Jewish experience and teachers themselves often are not aware. Jews have fought in every American war. They have contributed to every aspect of American life from literature and the arts to science and politics. We are a distinct minority whose story remains hidden. So how can young readers learn about the Jewish presence in American history?

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The Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project is a landmark initiative that digitally reunites pre-war archival and library collections from YIVO, the Strashun Library, the An-sky Museum and other important Jewish institutions in pre-war Vilna. It encompasses over 2.5 million pages of material from YIVO in New York, the Martynas Mazvydas National Library of Lithuania, the Lithuanian Central State Archives and the Wroblewski Library in Vilnius.

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In 2015, Dalia Hoffman, one of the first to receive a degree through the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan, donated a library of some two hundred printed materials, primarily written in Hebrew and published in the first half of the twentieth century, to the research collections of the University Library. These items were amassed by Dalia's maternal grandfather, Elazar Troppe, who was one of the founders of Petaḥ-Tikvah and shipped in the 1980s to Dalia's parents in East Lansing, MI.

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The goal of this presentation is to familiarize the audience with the history of Bracha Fuld (1926-1946). Bracha was born in Berlin and moved to London with her mother in 1938. In 1939, they moved to British Mandate Palestine. Although considered the first female resistance fighter killed in pre-state Israel in the struggle against the British authorities (she was a member of the Palmach), Bracha Fuld’s story remains relatively unknown to scholars as well as to the general public.

Barbara Diamond Goldin, Rich Michelson and Lesléa Newman, all of whom received the Sydney Taylor Award, will discuss their careers as creators of Jewish children’s books with Horn Book editor-in-chief Roger Sutton. Topics they will discuss include: What inspired you to become an author? What did you read as a child? What were and are your main influences? What brings you to Jewish topics? What is the role of Jewish books in the movement for more diverse children’s books? What has been your viewpoint on the need for diverse books and where Jewish books fit in to that?

This will be the most productive and enjoyable time you have ever spent at any conference! Join presenters for a facilitated process that has benefitted over 2,800 participants (students, faculty, librarians, and academic and nonprofit administrators). CoLAB Workshops connect conference participants during 3-minute speed-meetings. You’ll walk away with more resources than you ever imagined. Focused conversations will yield: potential collaborative relationships and problem solving of issues by discovering hidden resources.

Many Czech synagogues and cemeteries were damaged during the German occupation in World War II or were destroyed following the war when the country was under communist rule for forty years. Financed by a grant from the EU, plus additional funding from the Czech Culture Ministry, The Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Republic undertook the 10 Star Project, a project to reconstruct, restore and preserve fifteen important historical buildings: synagogues, rabbinical houses and Jewish schools (cheders) in ten towns in Bohemia, Moravia, and Silesia.

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This paper focuses on the image of the librarian, and the subcategory of the Jewish librarian in film, literature, and television. Of the many examples of the Jewish librarian in film and TV, we consider David Mamet's work, Homicide, the Israeli film The Matchmaker, the film Sophie's Choice, and the Israeli film, The Footnote הערת שוליים‎, translit. He'arat Shulayim), among many other test cases. We put the images of Jewish librarians in the context of the many images of librarians and libraries from the wider world from Marian the librarian in The Music Man to Citizen Cane.

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Representatives from the Israel and Judaica Section of the Library of Congress will discuss a variety of acquisitions and cataloging matters, including new and recent classification numbers and subject headings, highlights of IJ Section cataloging practice, developments in serials cataloging and processing, and general Library of Congress news.

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Barbara Diamond Goldin, Rich Michelson and Lesléa Newman, all of whom received the Sydney Taylor Award, will discuss their careers as creators of Jewish children’s books with Horn Book editor-in-chief Roger Sutton. Topics they will discuss include: What inspired you to become an author? What did you read as a child? What were and are your main influences? What brings you to Jewish topics? What is the role of Jewish books in the movement for more diverse children’s books? What has been your viewpoint on the need for diverse books and where Jewish books fit in to that?

Jewish children’s books have a history of reflecting Jewish values - social justice and activism, kindness and compassion, the value of education, etc. A panel of social justice educators will discuss sharing books with children and helping young people find their voices in whatever endeavors motivate them to help change the world for the better.

Barbara Diamond Goldin, Rich Michelson and Lesléa Newman, all of whom received the Sydney Taylor Award, will discuss their careers as creators of Jewish children’s books with Horn Book editor-in-chief Roger Sutton. Topics they will discuss include: What inspired you to become an author? What did you read as a child? What were and are your main influences? What brings you to Jewish topics? What is the role of Jewish books in the movement for more diverse children’s books? What has been your viewpoint on the need for diverse books and where Jewish books fit in to that?

This session explores the first-of-its-kind exhibition on the topic “of Jews and Chocolate”, at the Bernard Museum of Temple Emanu-El, New York City, and how it crosses the museum/library divisions. While many museum exhibitions generate catalogs, this one builds on the research from an existing book, On the Chocolate Trail. It brings food into a museum setting rather than to demonstrations or expos.

Over one hundred works of fiction with Jewish content are published each year by mainstream, Jewish, and small, independent presses. So many books, so little time! How do we sift through the good, the great, and the not-so-great? How can reading books with Jewish characters and themes help educate, enlighten and inspire us? What are the new trends in the Jewish publishing world? Explore the latest and greatest in Jewish fiction for adult readers with the members of the new AJL Fiction Award Committee and come prepared to share some of your favorite new titles.

This is a short introduction to the first Sephardic immigration to Argentina, including the four main groups according to their places of origin, their institutions, synagogues and schools. Rita Saccal will be specifically referring to the CIDICSEF, the only academic Sephardic institution in Latin America, their activities, publications and library.

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In 1999, Marlene authored a presentation entitled “NACO after Five Years: The Experience of Yeshiva University” (Proceedings of the 34th Annual Convention of the Association of Jewish Libraries, AJL: 2000, pp. 106-113). It is time to reevaluate our experience with a paper entitled “NACO after 25 Years.” There have been many changes in cataloging in general, and in the establishment of names in particular, that have both benefited the NACO community and have complicated the process.

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Since 1980, women’s history has been celebrated nationally in the month of March. Stories of ordinary and extraordinary women provide resources and inspiration for learning about women’s history – and particularly Jewish women’s history - throughout the year. We’ll explore picture books dealing with a variety of these “Wonder Women,” from Gal Gadot to Golda Meir, the biblical Sarah, Rabbi Akiva’s wife, the artist Lee Krasner, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Yiddish theater actress Betty Rosenberg and others.

Representatives from the Israel and Judaica Section of the Library of Congress will discuss a variety of acquisitions and cataloging matters, including new and recent classification numbers and subject headings, highlights of IJ Section cataloging practice, developments in serials cataloging and processing, and general Library of Congress news.

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The panel will discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing middle grade literature from the perspective of readership, writing, publishing and marketing. Catriella will share insights from four years of market testing books with tweens, including PJ Our Way’s selection criteria, as well as a discussion of their three selection principles: market testing, author support, and user feedback.

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The panel will discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing middle grade literature from the perspective of readership, writing, publishing and marketing. Catriella will share insights from four years of market testing books with tweens, including PJ Our Way’s selection criteria, as well as a discussion of their three selection principles: market testing, author support, and user feedback.

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The Judaica Collection of the Harvard Library has as its mission the documentation of the Jewish people throughout history in order to support teaching and research at Harvard and to serve as a resource for the global scholarly community. One of the key components in carrying out that mission is the documentation of Jewish life and culture in the State of Israel.

Everyone is familiar with digitization as a method of preserving obsolete media formats. However, it is always best to preserve the original source when possible. Jackie will cover how to identify unfamiliar types of film and the different conditions required to store them. She will also give some tips on handling them so as to cause the least amount of damage.

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SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Context) is a way to address the archival diaspora issue by allowing archivists, librarians and scholars to jointly maintain information about the people documented in archival collections. This presentation will introduce the AJL community to the tool, its research and development, and where the project is currently headed by examining examples. Find out how to use the tool for your institution and how it is built.

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Representatives from the Israel and Judaica Section of the Library of Congress will discuss a variety of acquisitions and cataloging matters, including new and recent classification numbers and subject headings, highlights of IJ Section cataloging practice, developments in serials cataloging and processing, and general Library of Congress news.

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In the late 1940s, Kathryn Yochelson, a Jewish American student and lover of art, discovered that new Jewish art was being created in the Land of Israel. With a strengthened belief in the continuity of Jewish art from ancient times to the modern period, she set herself up to introducing Israeli art to the American public as a way to enhance connections between communities in the U.S. and the newly founded state. Yochelson lectured about Israeli art and organized exhibitions in public spaces, presenting Israel’s landscape, people and culture to the local audience.

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The activity of the Jewish community and individual Jews during World War I - on both sides of the conflict - is reflected in archival collections, rare items, books, documents and ephemera held in the Yeshiva University Libraries, particularly in its Special Collections.

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Thanks to a start-up gift from the Gershwind-Bennett Families, in the Fall of 2016, the Penn Libraries initiated an integrated program of Judaica Digital Humanities (DH) research and development. The primary goal has been to think creatively and experimentally about what we can DO with data that we have already produced in digital formats. Our understanding of DH as “what we can do with data” is not limited to specific applications like text-mining, but to an unlimited potential number of ways in which to recycle and play with data.

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This paper will discuss the history of how the collection came to Yale and some of the rare and important books it contains.

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Ellen’s presentation will be about American Jewish children’s book authors and illustrators who have had a lasting impact on children’s literature. These authors have written books that are considered classics, read by millions of children, and published in numerous languages. The focus will be on the authors Ezra Jack Keats and Margaret and H. A. Rey. Other authors mentioned will be Maurice Sendak and Margot Zemach. Ellen will conclude her presentation with suggestions for programs of Jewish interest based on the life of these authors.

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Representatives from the Israel and Judaica Section of the Library of Congress will discuss a variety of acquisitions and cataloging matters, including new and recent classification numbers and subject headings, highlights of IJ Section cataloging practice, developments in serials cataloging and processing, and general Library of Congress news.

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The memoirs of Bertha Kalich (1874‐1939) constitute an important primary source for research in Jewish studies, gender studies, and theater history. Bertha Kalich was among the first actresses to publish her memoirs in Yiddish, serialized in the newspaper “Der Tog” in 1925 under the title, “Mayn Lebn” (My Life) and microfilmed by The New York Public Library. Amanda Seigel has translated Kalich’s memoirs and subsequently published excerpts from the translation, revealing a treasure trove of information and insights.

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Authors of both fiction and non-fiction books must do serious research before beginning to put words on paper. Facts must be checked. Characters – both real and imagined – must be fleshed out. Librarians are important partners in this process. This panel of authors and librarians will discuss how they work together to make books come alive.

For a variety of reasons, the value of maintaining a Synagogue, Center or School Library has been called into question in recent years. While librarians are passionate about the need for a library in their institution, what information can they provide to their Board members so that fiduciary decisions can be made responsibly? This session will explore ways to define both the tangible and intangible benefits of School, Synagogue and Center Libraries in a manner that will encourage the Board of Trustees to support this crucial part of the institution.

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The Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project is a landmark initiative that digitally reunites pre-war archival and library collections from YIVO, the Strashun Library, the An-sky Museum and other important Jewish institutions in pre-war Vilna. It encompasses over 2.5 million pages of material from YIVO in New York, the Martynas Mazvydas National Library of Lithuania, the Lithuanian Central State Archives and the Wroblewski Library in Vilnius.

Representatives from the Israel and Judaica Section of the Library of Congress will discuss a variety of acquisitions and cataloging matters, including new and recent classification numbers and subject headings, highlights of IJ Section cataloging practice, developments in serials cataloging and processing, and general Library of Congress news.

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Many libraries acquire their Judaica collections from private individuals. These personal collections were developed, some with purpose and direction, while others were developed more randomly. This presentation will look at the books of one personal home library that was frozen in time and place, glean from the inscriptions and stamps found therein, surmise how this collection was put together, and perhaps even learn the reading habits of the owners.

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The Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at Simmons College is a rigorous advanced degree program (MA/MS/MFA/MAT) that looks at children’s literature as literature, examining children’s books through a variety of critical-theory lenses.

Over one hundred works of fiction with Jewish content are published each year by mainstream, Jewish, and small, independent presses. So many books, so little time! How do we sift through the good, the great, and the not-so-great? How can reading books with Jewish characters and themes help educate, enlighten and inspire us? What are the new trends in the Jewish publishing world? Explore the latest and greatest in Jewish fiction for adult readers with the members of the new AJL Fiction Award Committee and come prepared to share some of your favorite new titles.

What is a Jewish poem? How can poetry be integrated into educational curricula and cultural programming? How can poetry enhance our understanding of Jewish history and culture? What is a Jewish poetic praxis? What is the state of Jewish poetry today? Through a reading of their

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Over one hundred works of fiction with Jewish content are published each year by mainstream, Jewish, and small, independent presses. So many books, so little time! How do we sift through the good, the great, and the not-so-great? How can reading books with Jewish characters and themes help educate, enlighten and inspire us? What are the new trends in the Jewish publishing world? Explore the latest and greatest in Jewish fiction for adult readers with the members of the new AJL Fiction Award Committee and come prepared to share some of your favorite new titles.

In 2017-2018, The National Library of Israel has made important strides in its collections, cataloguing, digitization and public access. From the continuing processing of the famed Valmadonna collection to mysterious manuscript amulets smuggled out of the Soviet Union, collections continue to expand. Digitizing and cataloguing of Kiyat Sefer as well as international cooperation related to RDA and authority files also lead the agenda.

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At the 2017 AJL conference, Amalia presented on the archival processing and digitization of the Barbados Synagogue Restoration Project records. The resulting digital archives offer a glimpse into a series of initiatives to restore and develop the synagogue block and into Jewish life and history on this island in the Caribbean. At the same time, the completion of this project was not really an end, but the beginning of a quest to extend the information contained within.

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This will be the most productive and enjoyable time you have ever spent at any conference! Join presenters for a facilitated process that has benefitted over 2,800 participants (students, faculty, librarians, and academic and nonprofit administrators). CoLAB Workshops connect conference participants during 3-minute speed-meetings. You’ll walk away with more resources than you ever imagined. Focused conversations will yield: potential collaborative relationships and problem solving of issues by discovering hidden resources.

This presentation reveals the attempts of the library to influence the current national identity dynamics in turning its vectors into acceptance and integration through knowing and reflecting. It is being done by making the library an influential cultural actor. This paper demonstrates the agility of the tensions and changes in the evaluation of the past becoming a constituent of the present-day identity. In the context of global processes, Lithuanian society is undergoing changes in cultural, political and psychological identity.

The goal of this presentation is to familiarize the audience with the history of Bracha Fuld (1926-1946). Bracha was born in Berlin and moved to London with her mother in 1938. In 1939, they moved to British Mandate Palestine. Although considered the first female resistance fighter killed in pre-state Israel in the struggle against the British authorities (she was a member of the Palmach), Bracha Fuld’s story remains relatively unknown to scholars as well as to the general public.

Authors of both fiction and non-fiction books must do serious research before beginning to put words on paper. Facts must be checked. Characters – both real and imagined – must be fleshed out. Librarians are important partners in this process. This panel of authors and librarians will discuss how they work together to make books come alive.

Author Sydelle Pearl will explain how seeing a milk can on exhibit at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum nearly twenty years ago touched her deeply and served as the inspiration for her to write her novel, Wordwings, set in the Warsaw Ghetto. Sydelle will describe her research, writing and publication journey for Wordwings (Guernica Editions, October 2017) and about how the power of Story and Art can uplift people during bleak times.

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Simmons College professor and author Megan Dowd Lambert will present a range of picture books, many by Jewish authors and illustrators, to provide an introduction to her Whole Book Approach (WBA) storytime model. She developed the WBA in association with The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and it is the subject of her book, Reading Picture Books with Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking About What They See (Charlesbridge 2015).

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Authors of both fiction and non-fiction books must do serious research before beginning to put words on paper. Facts must be checked. Characters – both real and imagined – must be fleshed out. Librarians are important partners in this process. This panel of authors and librarians will discuss how they work together to make books come alive.

Jewish children’s books have a history of reflecting Jewish values - social justice and activism, kindness and compassion, the value of education, etc. A panel of social justice educators will discuss sharing books with children and helping young people find their voices in whatever endeavors motivate them to help change the world for the better.

Jewish children’s books have a history of reflecting Jewish values - social justice and activism, kindness and compassion, the value of education, etc. A panel of social justice educators will discuss sharing books with children and helping young people find their voices in whatever endeavors motivate them to help change the world for the better.

Jewish children’s books have a history of reflecting Jewish values - social justice and activism, kindness and compassion, the value of education, etc. A panel of social justice educators will discuss sharing books with children and helping young people find their voices in whatever endeavors motivate them to help change the world for the better.

This presentation will highlight a number of new resources of the JDC Archives. The focus will be on material of interest to Judaica librarians including:
• A new exciting face to the JDC Archives website
• New collections available online
• Newly opened Artifacts and Ephemera Collection now online
• How to access our historic Film Collection, including screening of a film clip
• New resources of interest to genealogists and family historians
• New fellowships for scholars and researchers
• New documentary film grant

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Brandeis University’s Archives & Special Collections Department and the Haifa Feminist Institute at Isha L’Isha have embarked on a joint pilot project based on their extensive archival American Jewish and Israeli feminism collections. The project centers around a web portal designed to serve as an online clearinghouse and educational and academic resource wherein researchers can learn about the feminism collections at these institutions.

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The panel will discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing middle grade literature from the perspective of readership, writing, publishing and marketing. Catriella will share insights from four years of market testing books with tweens, including PJ Our Way’s selection criteria, as well as a discussion of their three selection principles: market testing, author support, and user feedback.

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The panel will discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing middle grade literature from the perspective of readership, writing, publishing and marketing. Catriella will share insights from four years of market testing books with tweens, including PJ Our Way’s selection criteria, as well as a discussion of their three selection principles: market testing, author support, and user feedback.

Files:

Barbara Diamond Goldin, Rich Michelson and Lesléa Newman, all of whom received the Sydney Taylor Award, will discuss their careers as creators of Jewish children’s books with Horn Book editor-in-chief Roger Sutton. Topics they will discuss include: What inspired you to become an author? What did you read as a child? What were and are your main influences? What brings you to Jewish topics? What is the role of Jewish books in the movement for more diverse children’s books? What has been your viewpoint on the need for diverse books and where Jewish books fit in to that?

Getting the facts right is imperative for fiction writers. Lisa believes that children’s literature has a crucial goal beyond entertainment, as certain subject matters may only be presented to a child once in their lifetime, creating a lasting impression that may or may not be accurate to history. Authors should strive to balance the fiction genre with a responsibility to educate our youth with truth, whenever possible.

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The Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at Simmons College is a rigorous advanced degree program (MA/MS/MFA/MAT) that looks at children’s literature as literature, examining children’s books through a variety of critical-theory lenses.

This session explores the first-of-its-kind exhibition on the topic “of Jews and Chocolate”, at the Bernard Museum of Temple Emanu-El, New York City, and how it crosses the museum/library divisions. While many museum exhibitions generate catalogs, this one builds on the research from an existing book, On the Chocolate Trail. It brings food into a museum setting rather than to demonstrations or expos.

Amira will talk about the significance of the editing modifications that the kibbutzim that belonged to the Labor Zionist socialist movement made to the traditional version of the Passover Haggadah. She will present special and exceptional items from the kibbutz movement Haggadot collection, which includes various types of handwritten, rare and artistic Haggadot that were designed to be read in a large family-like community and used at the Passover Seder to transmit its local myth to new generations.

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In 1935, Rosa Manus (1881-1942) and two other Dutch feminists founded the International Archives for the Women’s Movement (IAV) in Amsterdam. It contained Manus’s collection from her work in international suffrage and the collection of physician Aletta Jacobs (l854-1929). The archives’ core was material collected by these two Dutch Jewish women. After the Nazis invaded the Netherlands in 1940, soldiers stole the collection. Manus was arrested in 1941 and gassed in 1942. In 1992, a Dutch scholar spotted some of the stolen materials in an archive in Moscow.

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The Second World War brought to an end a thousand-years existence of Polish Jews and their cultural heritage. From over 748 secular Jewish libraries and unnumbered religious and private book collections that existed in Poland before 1939, only fragments remained. Usually, little attention is paid to these Bibliocaust survivors, but like other cultural assets stolen by the Nazis, they have a particular memory value.

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Access to online content is an ever-increasing demand by researchers. This demand has benefitted libraries with significant digitized collections as they can now attract new users who previously could not have accessed the institution’s holdings. This opportunity comes with the challenge that digitization is time consuming, which creates a significant staffing expense.

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In July 2003, the Rothschild Foundation Hanadiv Europe launched its Jewish Archives and Libraries Grant Programme. Fifteen years later, the Foundation has grown this programme tenfold, supporting increased accessibility to Jewish materials in 30 European countries – from Belgium to Uzbekistan, Bosnia to Finland, and many points in between.

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The Judaica Collection of the Harvard Library has as its mission the documentation of the Jewish people throughout history in order to support teaching and research at Harvard and to serve as a resource for the global scholarly community. One of the key components in carrying out that mission is the documentation of Jewish life and culture in the State of Israel.

The Judaica Collection of the Harvard Library has as its mission the documentation of the Jewish people throughout history in order to support teaching and research at Harvard and to serve as a resource for the global scholarly community. One of the key components in carrying out that mission is the documentation of Jewish life and culture in the State of Israel.

What is a Jewish poem? How can poetry be integrated into educational curricula and cultural programming? How can poetry enhance our understanding of Jewish history and culture? What is a Jewish poetic praxis? What is the state of Jewish poetry today? Through a reading of their

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What is a Jewish poem? How can poetry be integrated into educational curricula and cultural programming? How can poetry enhance our understanding of Jewish history and culture? What is a Jewish poetic praxis? What is the state of Jewish poetry today? Through a reading of their

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What is a Jewish poem? How can poetry be integrated into educational curricula and cultural programming? How can poetry enhance our understanding of Jewish history and culture? What is a Jewish poetic praxis? What is the state of Jewish poetry today? Through a reading of their

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Library collection development policies establish the parameters of the library’s collection and describe the criteria librarians and information professionals employ to select and maintain collections of material. Ideally, library collection development policies reflect and enact the library’s mission statement and, as they do so, they serve as operationalized statements of the values of the library and the greater institution in which it might be situated.

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Among the beautiful murals produced by John Singer Sargent for the Boston Public Library, The Synagogue stands out for its fraught history. While recognizing Sargent's exceptional artistic achievement, the community of Boston and beyond met this piece's installation with resistance. For several years following its initial unveiling in 1919, public debate raged over whether the piece reinforced past prejudice, taking place in printed words, in legislation in the Massachusetts State House, and in splashing ink on the painting itself.

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Over one hundred works of fiction with Jewish content are published each year by mainstream, Jewish, and small, independent presses. So many books, so little time! How do we sift through the good, the great, and the not-so-great? How can reading books with Jewish characters and themes help educate, enlighten and inspire us? What are the new trends in the Jewish publishing world? Explore the latest and greatest in Jewish fiction for adult readers with the members of the new AJL Fiction Award Committee and come prepared to share some of your favorite new titles.

The Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project is a landmark initiative that digitally reunites pre-war archival and library collections from YIVO, the Strashun Library, the An-sky Museum and other important Jewish institutions in pre-war Vilna. It encompasses over 2.5 million pages of material from YIVO in New York, the Martynas Mazvydas National Library of Lithuania, the Lithuanian Central State Archives and the Wroblewski Library in Vilnius.

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The Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project is a landmark initiative that digitally reunites pre-war archival and library collections from YIVO, the Strashun Library, the An-sky Museum and other important Jewish institutions in pre-war Vilna. It encompasses over 2.5 million pages of material from YIVO in New York, the Martynas Mazvydas National Library of Lithuania, the Lithuanian Central State Archives and the Wroblewski Library in Vilnius.

Eighteen years ago, Israeli author Ruby Namdar arrived in New York, not knowing that he had just taken the first step of an incredible literary, cultural and personal journey. The novel The Ruined House, winner of the 2014 Sapir Prize, Israel’s most prestigious literary award, was an artistic response to Namdar’s wonderful experience of discovering America, American Jewry and American Jewish literature.

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